Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the political cliche of low-hanging fruit is something so cartoonishly insensitive, so cartoonishly villainous, you then bring upon us a second political cliche. you have jumped the shark. blocking voluntary efforts by people to get rid of their own guns because they want to voluntarily? that is an exercise in shark jumping. this is the sort of thing that might make sense internally to the nra when they talk about this amongst themselves, but the rest of the country are not picking a fight, but looking for problem solving, nonconfrontational ways to help each other out. trying to block the voluntary tucson gun buyback program does not make sense. the whole reason gun policy is supposed to be seen as so intractable, so unreformable, so politically untouchable and not in america is that the national rifle association has created a mystique about themselves, a mystique about their own power that is supposed to caution anyone who might want to reform gun laws that it just cannot be done. no matter who we are, no matter where we live, no matter how or why we might want to reform our gun laws, no ma
or awesome you are fined and that money goes charity. we don't deal in cliches here. fiscal cliff for the lake superior university, no more fiscal cliff. kick the can down the road. double down, job creators, yolo, i don't know what that is, spoil alert. super food, guru. any of those? >> fiscal cliff, it was not the phrase it was the phrase worked. >> bill: you use it 87,000 times? >> the process went on for 87,000 years. i don't know canadian university wants to ban these words. kick the can down the road. that actually works. >> bill: i never said it. kick the can down the road budget problems, pinheaded debates, armageddon. >> the word that drove me crazy, caution. [ laughter ] >> i hear it every day. every day from this guy. calls, when i hear i go nuts. there is guy going like this. >> bill: you realize that gut field is making his last appearance. what is boneless wings. >> that is chicken wings without the bone. it's now on menus. it's disgusting. yolo is you only live once. that an internet thing. >> for a lot of people that is once too many. >> bill: what is yolo? >> the
in such a black state? um...i know it sounds a cliche but they have been in the attic. along with broken umbrellas and three thousand coat hangers. do you know why they were put there? or where they were before that? no, we don't know too much. it's my wife's father's. i've asked my father-in-law about his memory of it and he's very sage and he seems to recall them but isn't too sure about exactly where nor how. but i think he's had them a few years. because there's a number of things that have intrigued me about this and the first thing is these kangaroo handles. now, these are pieces of english silver, so i can only imagine that these kangaroos on the edge here it must have been made for some special australian dignitary or a family with australian connections because it's quite unusual to find a piece of english silver with kangaroos on. more importantly if we tip it up here it's got a set of hallmarks along here right. which is for the most famous 19th century silversmith of them all-- chap called paul storr. and he was the royal goldsmith to george iv. and we
--i mean, the human element, in a fresh way without dredging up a lot of cliches. c-span: where do you live now, by the way? >> guest: right now, i'm a visiting writer in residence at memphis, university of memphis. c-span: memphis university? >> guest: yes. c-span: when did you first know that you liked writing? >> guest: well, as i say, in high school, i was writing science fiction. i was--excuse me... c-span: so in school itself? >> guest: yeah. well, it was something i just did. i never thought of it as a profession or even a trade. i just sort of did it and... c-span: did you ever have a point where a teacher came up and said, 'randall, this is good'? >> guest: actually, my teachers were fairly critical of my writing up to a point. i--really, it was in college when i started taking it a little more seriously and--i mean, i--again, i'd been writing very, you know, pitiful stories and i fell under the tutorship of one max steele, who was a--the--ran the writing program at chapel hill for a long time, and he challenged a lot of my ideas about taste and source material, and he sort of knew
exercise. it's a lifestyle change. it's kind of cliche, but it truly is. >> so there's no shortcuts. >> no, there aren't. look, it's very simple. it's less going in and more exercise. >> is it a challenge, though, every day? >> oh, yeah. >> but have you changed your lifestyle? >> i've changed, but it's still work. again -- and my wife, deborah roberts, who's on 20/20 and abc, she's a person who eats, but she's a size 4. she works out. she runs. there's a certain mindset, i think, that naturally thin people have that those of us who are not don't have. we were at the chicago airport a few weeks ago coming home, and we're walking down one of the terminals. and we're walking by a mcdonald's, and i went, ooh, mcrib is back. she didn't even see that sign, but i saw mcrib is back. >> probably some beautiful picture. >> my old friend, mcrib. hello, mcrib, i've missed you so. >> what i think is fun is that you actually use d food to woo your then friend into being your fiancee. >> deborah was going off to do the olympics and asked me -- look, we're friends. she's a beautiful woman. we're friends.
right, and i think that falls in the phase zero. you have to have skip in the game, i know it's a cliche, but if you're not there present, then the asians question extraordinarily why you're going to come in when the stakes get much higher, and they don't even need to think out to the existential question of soviet -- chinese icbms just hoping for the good old days hoping things were much clearer, chinese icbms raining down on them and does the nuclear umbrella still hold? as you point out, we've already been doing offshore balancing even while being present because we've had the filipinos, the japanese come to us in these territorial disputes and say are you backing us up, and what are you doing? the administration's response has been we take no position on sovereignty issues, we want to see the status quo maintained, but it's up to you to solve it. now i think, ironically, the right position. it's not for us to defend ya pap's territory, but it is for us to understand how the balance of power in the region is changing, and by not reacting we are changing the actions of our allies. and
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)